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Becoming an Art Therapist: Enabling Growth, Change, and Action for Emerging Students in the Field
Junge, Maxine Borowsky and Kim Newall | Foreword by Ellen Greene Stewart
Charles C. Thomas, Publishers / Softcover / 2015-04-01 / 0398090734
Expressive Arts Therapies
price: $59.50
184 pages
In Stock (Ships within one business day)

This is not a "how-to" book but rather about the "experience" of becoming an art therapist. The text covers issues in supervision and mentorship, contains stories by art therapy students about what they are thinking and feeling, and letters to young art therapists by highly regarded professionals in the field. The reader has the advantage of ideas and responses from both a student art therapist and an art therapist with many years' experience and is clearly intended for students aiming for a career. Chapter 1 is about students as a secret society and the importance of student colleagues. The second chapter is a short history of art therapy education, while Chapter 3 is a review of some literature potentially useful to art therapy students. Chapter 4 represents Kim Newall's journal with imagery of her internship experience as a third-year graduate student in a community clinic. For Chapter 5, art therapy graduate students in various geographical sections of the United States describe their worst and best student experiences and their most important role models. Chapter 6 is about mentoring–what it is and why an art therapist should have a mentor. In Chapter 7, twelve senior art therapists, each with many years' experience, write a personal letter to the coming generations of art therapists. The letter writers are all pioneers in the field. Finally, Chapter 8 offers a selected art therapy bibliography. This extraordinary book conveys the message "you can do this and it's worth it." The text is a much needed contribution to the field of art therapy. Students for many semesters to come will be reassured, validated, and informed. Experienced art therapists will ford valuable perspectives on supervision, teaching, and mentorship.

Synopsis: Rather than an instruction guide to becoming an art therapist, "Becoming An Art Therapist" focuses on the experience of becoming anart therapist. "Becoming An Art Therapist" covers issues in supervision and mentorship, contains stories by art therapy students about what theyare thinking and feeling, and letters to young. art therapists by highly regarded professionals in the field. The reader has the advantage of ideasand responses from both a student art therapist and an art therapist withmany years' experience and is clearly intended for students aiming for a career. Chapter 1 is about students as a secret society and the importanceof student colleagues. The second chapter is a short history of art therapyeducation,. while Chapter 3 is a review of some literature potentially useful to art therapy students. Chapter 4 represents Kim Newall's journalwith imagery of her internship experience as a third-year graduate student in a community clinic. For Chapter 5, art therapy graduate students in various geographical sections of the United States describe their worst and best student experiences and their most important role models. Chapter 6 is about mentoring-what it is and why an art therapistshould have a mentor. In Chapter 7, twelve senior art therapists, each with many years' experience, write a personal letter to the coming generations of art therapists. The letter writers are all pioneers in the field. Finally, Chapter 8 offers a selected art therapy bibliography.

Critique: Exceptionally well written, organized and presented, "Becoming An Art Therapist" will prove of very special interest and relevance, to anyone considering entering the specialized field of art therapy. A keenly commended addition to academic library collections,it should be noted for personal reading lists that "Becoming An Art Therapist" is also available in an ebook format.

Helen Dumont/The Midwest Book Review/June 2015


Contents:

Foreword by Ellen Greene Stewart
Preface

I. Introduction
II. A Short History of Art Therapy Education
III. A Good Book Is a Mentor
IV. Student Internship Journal by Kim Newall
V. Art Therapy Student Stories: What We Are Thinking and What We Are Feeling
VI. A Mentor
VII. Letters to a Young Art Therapist
Writers for this section
Sandra Graves-Alcorn
Maxine Borowsky Junge
Cliff Joseph
Frances Kaplan
Myra Levick
Cathy Malchiodi
Shaun McNiff
Bruce Moon
Catherine Hyland Moon
Arthur Robbins
Judith Rubin
Harriet Wadeson
VIII. Selected Art Therapy Bibliography


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