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Beyond the Archive: Memory, Narrative, and the Autobiographical Process
Brockmeier, Jens
Oxford University Press / Hardcover / 2015-08-01 / 0199861560
Memory
price: $88.00 (may be subject to change)
424 pages
Not in stock - ships in 1 to 2 weeks.

Our longstanding view of memory and remembering is in the midst of a profound transformation. This transformation does not only affect our concept of memory or a particular idea of how we remember and forget; it is a wider cultural process. In order to understand it, one must step back and consider what is meant when we say memory. Brockmeier's far-ranging studies offer such a perspective, synthesizing understandings of remembering from the neurosciences, humanities, social studies, andin key works of autobiographical literature and life-writing. His conclusions force us to radically rethink our very notion of memory as an archive of the past, one that suggests the natural existence of a distinctive human capacity (or a set of neuronal systems) enabling us to encode," "store," and "recall" past experiences.

Now, propelled by new scientific insights and digital technologies, a new picture is emerging. It shows that there are many cultural forms of remembering and forgetting, embedded in a broad spectrum of human activities and artifacts. This picture is more complex than any notion of memory as storage of the past would allow. Indeed it comes with a number of alternatives to the archival memory, one of which Brockmeier describes as the narrative approach. The narrative approach not only permits us to explore the storied weave of our most personal form of remembering - that is, the autobiographical - it also sheds new light on the interrelations among memory, self, and culture."

About the Author:

Jens Brockmeier is a professor at The American University of Paris. With a background in psychology, philosophy, and language studies, his interests are in issues of human identity, mind, and language, which he has examined in a variety of cultural contexts and under conditions of health and illness.

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