shopping cart
nothing in cart
 
browse by subject
new releases
best sellers
sale books
browse by author
browse by publisher
home
about us
upcoming events
May 29th - Deepening Your Clinical Supervision Skills: 18-hour Webinar [Leading Edge Seminars]
May 29th - Change Management: Successfully lead and implement change on a large, or small scale in your organization [SickKids CCMH Learning Institute]
Jun 1st - Certificate in Trauma Counselling for Mental Health Professionals: Level 1 trauma certificate [SickKids CCMH Learning Institute]
Jun 4th - Certificate in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Level 1: Practical solutions to real world problems - live webinar [SickKids CCMH Learning Institute]
Jun 9th - Hack Your Mind for Better Health [MAGentix]
schools agencies and other institutional orders (click here)
Free shipping across Canada, for the foreseeable future. Please read our Covid-19 statement here.
Join our mailing list! Click here to sign up.
How History Gets Things Wrong: The Neuroscience of Our Addiction to Stories
Rosenberg, Alex
MIT Press / Hardcover / 2018-10-01 / 0262038579
Psychology
reg price: $38.95 our price: $ 35.06 (may be subject to change)
304 pages
Not in Stock, usually ships in 3-6 business days

Why we learn the wrong things from narrative history, and how our love for stories is hard-wired.

To understand something, you need to know its history. Right? Wrong, says Alex Rosenberg in How History Gets Things Wrong. Feeling especially well-informed after reading a book of popular history on the best-seller list? Don't. Narrative history is always, always wrong. It not just incomplete or inaccurate but deeply wrong, as wrong as Ptolemaic astronomy. We no longer believe that the earth is the center of the universe. Why do we still believe in historical narrative? Our attachment to history as a vehicle for understanding has a long Darwinian pedigree and a genetic basis. Our love of stories is hard-wired. Neuroscience reveals that human evolution shaped a tool useful for survival into a defective theory of human nature. Stories historians tell, Rosenberg continues, are not only wrong but harmful. Israel and Palestine, for example, have dueling narratives of dispossession that prevent one side from compromising with the other. Henry Kissinger applied lessons drawn from the Congress of Vienna to American foreign policy with disastrous results. Human evolution improved primate mind reading—the ability to anticipate the behavior of others, whether predators, prey, or cooperators—to get us to the top of the African food chain. Now, however, this hard-wired capacity makes us think we can understand history—what the Kaiser was thinking in 1914, why Hitler declared war on the United States—by uncovering the narratives of what happened and why. In fact, Rosenberg argues, we will only understand history if we don't make it into a story.

About the Author:

Alex Rosenberg is R. Taylor Cole Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He is the author of The Atheist's Guide to Reality: Enjoying Life without Illusions and other books.

Caversham Booksellers
98 Harbord St, Toronto, ON M5S 1G6 Canada
(click for map and directions)
All prices in $cdn
Copyright 2020

Phone toll-free (800) 361-6120
Tel (416) 944-0962 | Fax (416) 944-0963
E-mail [email protected]
Hours: 9-6 Mon-Sat / Closed Sunday (EST)

search
Click here to read previous issues.
other lists
MIT Press
Psychology