shopping cart
nothing in cart
 
browse by subject
new releases
best sellers
sale books
browse by author
browse by publisher
home
about us
upcoming events
Mar 6th - Playing and Becoming in Psychoanalysis [Toronto Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis (TICP)]
Apr 18th - Making the Impossible Possible: Healing Trauma [CASC/ACSS - Canadian Association for Spiritual Care / Association Canadienne de Soins Spirituels]
May 1st - American Psychiatric Association 174th annual meeting, Los Angeles [APA]
Jun 17th - IARPP Conference 2021 - Expanding Our Clinical Experiences: The Spoken, Unspoken and Unspeakable in Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy [IARPP]
Jul 9th - 28th Annual OCD Conference [International OCD Foundation]
schools agencies and other institutional orders (click here)
Due to Covid-19, we are now open only for deliveries and pickups. Still free shipping across Canada for orders over $50. Please read our Covid-19 statement here.
Join our mailing list! Click here to sign up.
Making Sense Together: The Intersubjective Approach to Psychotherapy, 1e | older edition, out of print
Buirski, Peter and Pamela Haglund
Jason Aronson / Rowman & Littlefield / out-of-print pb / 2009-11-01 / 0765707527
price: $0.00 (may be subject to change)
280 pages
This title is currently unavailable.

As in raising children, in which each unique parent and child pair emerges from the ongoing, mutually influencing relationship, so it is with therapists and patients. Peter Buirski and Pamela Haglund argue that intersubjectivity is founded on two assumptions: First, our moment-by-moment experience of ourselves and the world emerges within a dynamic, fluid context of others; and, second, that we can never observe things as they exist in isolation.

It follows, then, that therapy is not a search for some objective truth, but what is most helpful is the quality of the relationship constructed in therapy, the personal engagement of patient and therapist. Practicing intersubjectively produces an understanding and appreciation of process. Time pressures or goal-directedness do not promote unfolding and illuminating.

Patients are striving for health, attempting to correct disappointing, destructive, or traumatizing experiences with their original caregivers, and long for an antidote to ward off such painful affects as shame or self-loathing. From the intersubjective perspective, resistance, or attempts to thwart the therapist's efforts, may be seen as healthy striving for self-protection. Demonstrating these points with vivid clinical examples, Buirski and Haglund discuss the key aspects of the relational model and offer clear and practical guidelines for therapists.

About the Authors
Peter Buirski, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of Denver, as well as Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. He is affiliated with the Denver Psychoanalytic Institute, and maintains a private practice in Denver. Pamela Haglund received her Psy.D. from the graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of Denver, where she now serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor and Clinical Supervisor. Author of several articles on contemporary psychoanalytic theory and treatment, she is in private practice in Denver.

Caversham Booksellers
98 Harbord St, Toronto, ON M5S 1G6 Canada
(click for map and directions)
All prices in $cdn
Copyright 2020

Phone toll-free (800) 361-6120
Tel (416) 944-0962 | Fax (416) 944-0963
E-mail [email protected]
Hours: 9-6 Mon-Sat / 12-5 Sun (EST)

search
Click here to read previous issues.
authors
Buirski, Peter
other lists
Jason Aronson
OPC Reading Lists (Ontario Psychotherapy and Couns
Phase 1
Print-on-Demand Titles
Rowman & Littlefield