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Skinner's Quests
Gilbert, Richard
Borden House Press / Softcover / 2016-12-01 / 0991956249
Fiction and Essays / Freud
price: $25.00
486 pages
In Stock (Ships within one business day)

TWO OF THE BEST KNOWN PSYCHOLOGISTS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY, B.F. Skinner and Sigmund Freud, never met. What if they had met? What if, as well, the young B.F. Skinner had discussed matters of mutual interest with Ludwig Wittgenstein, the century’s best known and most eccentric philosopher, also living in England in 1939?

Skinner’s Quests, a novel of ideas and relationships, describes a fictional trip to England by Skinner in May and June 1939. He traveled from his home in Minneapolis to London and Cambridge via Montreal and Glasgow. He returned via Lisbon and New York.

Skinner had two quests. Both were conceived by philosopher and political activist Bertrand Russell, then at the University of Chicago. Both were to do with Russell’s former student Ludwig Wittgenstein – already the 20th century’s preeminent philosopher.

One quest was to correct what Russell regarded as Wittgenstein’s futile flirtation with behaviorism. (Russell had misunderstood Skinner’s position.)

The other quest, in collaboration with the White House, was to exploit Wittgenstein’s association with Adolf Hitler. The two were born a few days apart and were at high school together. Moreover, in 1939 Wittgenstein was involved with the German government, negotiating exemptions for his family from the Nuremburg (Race) Laws. He was also pally with the Soviet government.

Skinner had little interest in Wittgenstein. He welcomed the trip – over the strong objections of his wife – for a chance to meet Sigmund Freud, who was dying in London. Skinner was an admirer of Freud’s writings, even though he disagreed with much of what the founder of psychoanalysis had to say. Skinner met Freud, and Freud’s daughter Anna. In Cambridge, Skinner met Alan Turing as well as Wittgenstein. This was just after Turing had devised the modern computer and before he become a key figure in British cryptanalysis.
During the odyssey, Skinner met with other real and several fictional characters. Some of his encounters were romantic. Some were merely social. Some had a sinister edge that reflected the time of his travels, made during one of modern history’s most fraught periods.

Skinner’s odyssey had mixed success. He had little apparent impact on Wittgenstein, but he clarified his own thinking about several matters and provided information of possible value to the White House. Early in his odyssey, Skinner had visions of being the Darwin of the twentieth century, doing for psychology what Darwin had done for biology in the nineteenth century. Freud cautioned Skinner that his disregard for free will could become associated with totalitarianism. Skinner let the matter rest, at least for the moment.

The book will appeal to readers interested in some or all of these topics: psychology, philosophy, language, evolution, transportation in the 1930s, and the politics of North America and Europe just before the Second World War.

About the Author:

SKINNER’S QUESTS IS RICHARD GILBERT’S FIRST NOVEL. He’s produced many non-fiction books and several hundred articles on topics that reflect the many jobs he’s had over a long working life.

The jobs have included high-school teacher and university professor, government scientist and elected politician, and journalist and consultant on transportation and urban issues with clients on five continents.
Richard’s main formal qualifications are in psychology, although he’s been doing other things for many years. He’s a member of the Writers’ Union of Canada.

Richard was born in London, England, in January 1940, not long after the period of this novel. He and Rosalind emigrated from Scotland to Canada in the late 1960s. They’ve lived in downtown Toronto for most of the time since. Their family includes numerous grandchildren ranging in age from newborn to early twenties.

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