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Handbook of Emergent Methods
Hesse-Biber, Sharlene and Patricia Leavy (Eds)
Guilford Publications / Hardcover / 2008-02-01 / 1593851472
Research
reg price: $182.50 our price: $ 164.25 (may be subject to change)
722 pages
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Social researchers increasingly find themselves looking beyond conventional methods to address complex research questions. The Handbook of Emergent Methods is the first book to comprehensively examine emergent qualitative and quantitative theories and methods across the social and behavioral sciences. Providing scholars and students with a way to retool their research choices, the volume presents cutting-edge approaches to data collection, analysis, and representation. Leading researchers describe alternative uses of traditional quantitative and qualitative tools; innovative hybrid or mixed methods; and new techniques facilitated by technological advances. Consistently formatted chapters explore the strengths and limitations of each method for studying different types of research questions and offer practical, in-depth examples.

"The book describes the 'roots' of the major qualitative methods and how they are developing, outlines innovations in research design and analysis, and explores the impact that these developments are having on methods per se. Hesse-Biber and Leavy are to be congratulated for bringing together leaders in the field to create this seminal work, which will have a profound impact on qualitative methods."—Janice M. Morse, Professor and Barnes Presidential Endowed Chair, College of Nursing, University of Utah

"This is a powerful and valuable work for anyone involved in social science research....Whether deconstructing document research, arts-based approaches, or historical methods, or extending our understanding of interviewing, performance ethnography, and participatory approaches, all of the chapters provide greater clarity about how we do what we do in the qualitative research community. If their goals were to illuminate, transform, and inspire, these editors and contributors have certainly hit their mark."
—Valerie J. Janesick, Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, University of South Florida

"This book will be of value to both novice and more well-established investigators who wish to pursue their research endeavors more flexibly, reflectively, and inclusively."—Bruce L. Berg, Department of Criminal Justice, California State University, Long Beach

"This comprehensive handbook details creative new approaches to asking and exploring questions within the social sciences. These approaches offer liberation from the narrowing straits of logical positivistic measurement and quantification, and chart the paths to addressing more socially meaningful questions. They provide means for examining social reality with fresh tools."
—Ruthellen Josselson, School of Psychology, Fielding Graduate University
"Hesse-Biber and Leavy's timely and constructive response to the collapse of disciplinary authority and the postmodern challenge in the social sciences does not take an 'anything goes' position. The editors and their collaborators argue for a principled and rational approach to orchestrating research that welcomes and evaluates a bewildering array of emergent methods in the social sciences. This handbook both provides invaluable, specific guidance to researchers and frames the notion of methodological emergence as a theoretical challenge in its own right."
—Davydd J. Greenwood, Goldwin Smith Professor of Anthropology, Cornell University

Contents:

Introduction: Pushing on the Methodological Boundaries—The Growing Need for Emergent Methods within and across the Disciplines, Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber and Patricia Leavy
I. Historical Context of Emergent Methods and Innovation in the Practice of Research Methods
Introduction to Part I, Patricia Leavy and Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber
History
1. History of Methods in Social Science Research, Karen M. Staller, Ellen Block, and Pilar S. Horner
2. Gender Inclusion, Contextual Values, and Strong Objectivity: Emergent Feminist Methods for Research in the Sciences, Sue V. Rosser
3. A Post-Newtonian, Postmodern Approach to Science: New Methods in Social Action Research, Lisa Cosgrove and Maureen McHugh
4. Emergence in and from Quasi-Experimental Design and Analysis, Melvin M. Mark
Document Research
5. Researching Documents: Emergent Methods, Lindsay Prior
6. Emergent Qualitative Document Analysis, David Altheide, Michael Coyle, Katie DeVriese, and Christopher Schneider
Grounded Theory
7. Grounded Theory as an Emergent Method, Kathy Charmaz
Interviewing
8. New Frontiers in Standardized Survey Interviewing, Frederick G. Conrad and Michael F. Schober
9. Emergent Approaches to Focus Group Research, David Morgan, Collin Fellows, and Heather Guevara
10. Emergent Issues in International Focus Group Discussions, Monique M. Hennink
11. Three Dimensions and More: Oral History Beyond the Paradoxes of Method, Michael Frisch
Ethnography
12. Narrative Ethnography, Jaber F. Gubrium and James A. Holstein
13. Public Ethnography, Carol A. Bailey
14. Emergent Methods in Autoethnographic Research: Autoethnographic Narrative and the Multiethnographic Turn, Christine S. Davis and Carolyn Ellis
15. New Critical Collaborative Ethnography, Himika Bhattacharya
Arts-Based Practice
16. Visual Research Methods: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?, Gunilla Holm
17. Performance-Based Emergent Methods, Patricia Leavy
II. Innovations in Research Methods Design and Analysis
Introduction to Part II, Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber
18. Mixed Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches: An Introduction to Emergent Mixed Methods Research, Vicki L. Plano Clark, John W. Creswell, Denise O. Green, and Ronald J. Shope
19. Emergent Techniques in the Gathering and Analysis of Mixed-Methods Data, Charles Teddlie, Abbas Tashakkori, and Burke Johnson
20. Data Analysis and Interpretation: Emergent Issues in Linking Qualitative and Quantitative Evidence, Sarah Irwin
21. Longitudinal Research: An Emergent Method in the Social Sciences, Elisabetta Ruspini
22. Categorizing and Connecting Strategies in Qualitative Data Analysis, Joseph A. Maxwell and Barbara A. Miller
23. Metaphorical Analysis: An Emergent Analytical Tool, Zazie Todd and Simon J. Harrison
24. Hearing Voices: Listening for Multiplicity and Movement in Interview Data, Lynn Sorsoli and Deborah L. Tolman
III. The Impact of Emergent Technologies on Research Methods
Introduction to Part III, Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber
25. Internet Research as Emergent Practice, Christine Hine
26. Internet-Mediated Research as an Emergent Method and Its Potential Role in Facilitating Mixed-Methods Research, Claire Hewson
27. Hypermedia Methods for Qualitative Research, Bella Dicks & Bruce Mason
28. Mixed Emotions, Mixed Methods: The Role of Emergent Technologies in Studying User Experience in Context, Ingrid Mulder and Joke Kort
29. Emergent Methods in Feminist Geography, Mei-Po Kwan
30. Neural Networks an Emergent Method in Quantitative Research: An Example of Self-Organizing Maps, Natalia Sarkisian
31. User-Centered Perspectives on Qualitative Data Analysis Software: The Impact of Emergent Technologies and Future Trends, Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber and Christine Crofts
32. The Role of Computer-Assisted Qualitative Data Analysis: Impact on Emergent Methods in Qualitative Research, Nigel Fielding

Contributors:

David Altheide, School of Justice and Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Carol Bailey, Department of Sociology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia
Himika Bhattacharya, Institute of Communications Research, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois
Ellen Block, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Kathy Charmaz, Department of Sociology, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, California
Frederick G. Conrad, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Lisa Cosgrove, Department of Counseling and School Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts
Michael Coyle, Department of Political Science, California State University, Chico, California
John W. Creswell, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska
Christine Crofts, Department of Sociology, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts
Christine S. Davis, Department of Communication Studies, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina
Katie DeVriese, School of Justice and Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Bella Dicks, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom
Carolyn Ellis, Department of Communication, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida
Collin Fellows, Department of Sociology, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Nigel Fielding, Department of Sociology, University of Surrey, Surrey, United Kingdom
Michael Frisch, Department of History and American Studies, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York
Denise O. Green, Office for Institutional Diversity, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan
Jaber F. Gubrium, Department of Sociology, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri
Heather Guevara, Department of Sociology, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Simon J. Harrison, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Monique M. Hennink, Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber, Department of Sociology, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts
Claire Hewson, Department of Psychology, Open University, Milton Keynes, United Kingdom
Christine Hine, Department of Sociology, University of Surrey, Surrey, United Kingdom
Gunilla Holm, Department of Education, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
James A. Holstein, Department of Social and Cultural Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Pilar S. Horner, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sarah Irwin, Department of Sociology, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Burke Johnson, Department of Professional Studies, College of Education, University of South Alabama, Mobile, Alabama
Joke Kort, TNO Information and Communication Technology, Groningen, The Netherlands
Mei-Po Kwan, Department of Geography, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Patricia Leavy, Department of Sociology, Stonehill College, Easton, Massachusetts
Melvin M. Mark, Department of Psychology, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
Bruce Mason, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom
Joseph A. Maxwell, Graduate School of Education, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia
Maureen McHugh, Department of Psychology, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Indiana, Pennsylvania
Barbara A. Miller, Center for Leadership and Learning Communities, Education Development Center, Newton, Massachusetts
David Morgan, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
Ingrid Mulder, Institute for Communication, Media, and Information Technology, Rotterdam University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and Telematica Institute, Enschede, The Netherlands
Vicki L. Plano Clark, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska
Lindsay Prior, School of Sociology, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, Ireland, United Kingdom
Sue V. Rosser, School of History, Technology, and Society, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia
Elisabetta Ruspini, Department of Sociology, University of Milan–Bicocca, Milan, Italy
Natalia Sarkisian, Department of Sociology, Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts
Christopher Schneider, School of Justice and Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona
Michael F. Schober, Department of Psychology, New School for Social Research, New York, New York
Ronald J. Shope, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska
Lynn Sorsoli, Center for Research on Gender and Sexuality, San Francisco, California
Karen M. Staller, School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Abbas Tashakkori, College of Education, Florida International University, Miami, Florida
Charles Teddlie, College of Education, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Zazie Todd, Institute of Psychological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom
Deborah L. Tolman, Center for Research on Gender and Sexuality, and Human Sexuality Studies Program, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California

About the Editors:
Sharlene Nagy Hesse-Biber, Department of Sociology, Boston College,

Patricia Leavy, Department of Sociology, Stonehill College

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