shopping cart
nothing in cart
 
browse by subject
new releases
best sellers
sale books
browse by author
browse by publisher
home
about us
upcoming events
Sep 18th - The Forensic Dual Diagnosis Specialty Service Conference II: Exploring Risk & Recovery in Dual Diagnosis [CAMH Forensic Dual Diagnosis Specialty Service]
Sep 20th - Building Recovery Capital in Canada: Building on Our Strengths to Overcome Addiction - Saskatchewan [Last Door Recovery Society]
Sep 20th - Teenagers Today: What you need to know - Session 1: Signs, Symptoms and Risk Factors of Suicide. Session 2: How to Engage Adolescents in Psychotherapy. [SickKids CCMH Learning Institute]
Sep 20th - OACCPP 41st Annual Conference & AGM: Trauma, Resilience & Adaptability [OACCPP: the Ontario Association of Consultants, Counsellors, Psychometrists and Psychotherapists]
Sep 23rd - Digital Media Use in Youth: Mental health and screen time, a force for good or evil? Navigating the tensions between risk and opportunity associated with youth digital media use. [SickKids CCMH Learning Institute]
schools agencies and other institutional orders (click here)
Contemporary Directions in Psychopathology : Scientific Foundations of the DSM-V and ICD-11
Millon, Theodore, Robert F Krueger and Erik Simonsen
Guilford Publications / Hardcover / 2010-03-01 / 160623532X
The DSM
reg price: $138.50 our price: $ 117.73 (may be subject to change)
636 pages
Not in stock - ships in one week.

This forward-thinking volume grapples with critical questions surrounding the mechanisms underlying mental disorders and the systems used for classifying them. Edited and written by leading international authorities, many of whom are actively involved with the development of DSM-V and ICD-11, the book integrates biological and psychosocial perspectives. It provides balanced analyses of such hot-button issues as the role of social context and culture in psychopathology and the pros and cons of categorical versus dimensional approaches to diagnosis. Cutting-edge diagnostic instruments and research methods are reviewed. Throughout, contributors highlight the implications of current theoretical and empirical advances for understanding real-world clinical problems and developing more effective treatments.

"The time is ripe for a major reconsideration of the principles to be employed in any diagnostic classification, and this admirable volume does just that. The aim is not to present a new list of ‘facts,’ but rather to enable people to think clearly and critically about such key issues as whether to use dimensions or categories or prototypes, how to deal with comorbidity, the harmful dysfunction construct, and the interconnections between personality and mental disorders. The real value of the book lies in getting people to put aside prejudice and dogma and think creatively instead. The approaches discussed are practical and clinically relevant. This volume is essential reading for anyone with the slightest interest in classification and diagnosis. No one is likely to agree with everything in this wonderful book, but you will think more clearly after reading it. A substantial volume, full of wisdom and interest."—Michael Rutter, MD, FRS, Social, Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom

"DSM-IV has had tremendous effects—both positive and negative—on clinical practice and research. Will DSM-V be an improvement? This exceptional book explores such crucial issues as whether the diagnostic categories have construct validity, how symptom diagnoses relate to personality, the impact of culture on classification, and how to base the diagnostic process in neurobiology. This book is a 'must' for anyone who wonders how the DSM could be made more clinically relevant. You will not find a more sophisticated discussion of the essential issues in psychiatric diagnosis anywhere else."
—John F. Clarkin, PhD, Co-Director, Personality Disorders Institute, New York Presbyterian Hospital; Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College

"An impressive volume. Millon, Krueger, and Simonsen have assembled a stellar group of experts to provide up-to-date, scholarly, and innovative analyses of critical issues in psychopathology. Essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the challenges facing contemporary psychopathology and psychiatric nosology. The breadth and depth of the contributions will appeal both to experienced practitioners and researchers and to students training for the various mental health professions."
—W. John Livesley, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry (Professor Emeritus), University of British Columbia, Canada

Contents:

I. Historical and Cultural Perspectives
1. A Précis of Psychopathological History, Theodore Millon and Erik Simonsen
2. Themes in the Evolution of the 20th-Century DSMs, Roger K. Blashfield, Elizabeth Flanagan, and Kristin Raley
3. On the Wisdom of Considering Culture and Context in Psychopathology, Joseph P. Gone and Laurence J. Kirmayer
4. Cultural Issues in the Coordination of DSM-V and ICD-11, Renato D. Alarcón
5. A Sociocultural Conception of the Borderline Personality Disorder Epidemic, Theodore Millon

II. Conceptual Issues in Classification
6. Philosophical Issues in the Classification of Psychopathology, Peter Zachar and Kenneth S. Kendler
7. Classification Considerations in Psychopathology and Personology, Theodore Millon
8. Diagnostic Taxa as Open Concepts: Metatheoretical and Statistical Questions about Reliability and Construct Validity in the Grand Strategy of Nosological Revision, Paul E. Meehl
9. Contemplations on Meehl (1986): The Territory, Paul’s Map, and Our Progress in Psychopathology Classification (or, the Challenge of Keeping Up with a Beacon 30 Years Ahead of the Field), Mark F. Lenzenweger
10. Issues of Construct Validity in Psychological Diagnoses, Gregory T. Smith and Jessica Combs
11. The Meaning of Comorbidity among Common Mental Disorders, Nicholas R. Eaton, Susan C. South, and Robert F. Krueger
12. The Connections between Personality and Psychopathology, Susan C. South, Nicholas R. Eaton, and Robert F. Krueger
13. Is It True That Mental Disorders Are So Common, and So Commonly Co-Occur?, Mario Maj
14. Taking Disorder Seriously: A Critique of Psychiatric Criteria for Mental Disorders from the Harmful-Dysfunction Perspective, Jerome C. Wakefield

III. Methodological Approaches to Categories, Dimensions, and Prototypes
15. On the Substantive Grounding and Clinical Utility of Categories versus Dimensions, William M. Grove and Scott I. Vrieze
16. A Short History of a Psychiatric Diagnostic Category That Turned Out to Be a Disease, Roger K. Blashfield and Jared Keeley
17. Concepts and Methods for Researching Categories and Dimensions in Psychiatric Diagnosis, Helena Chmura Kraemer
18. The Integration of Categorical and Dimensional Approaches to Psychopathology, Erik Simonsen
19. Dimensionalizing Existing Personality Disorder Categories, Andrew E. Skodol
20. An Empirically Based Prototype Diagnostic System for DSM-V and ICD-11, Kile M. Ortigo, Bekh Bradley, and Drew Westen
21. The Millon Personality Spectrometer: A Tool for Personality Spectrum Analyses, Diagnoses, and Treatments, Theodore Millon, Seth Grossman, and Robert Tringone

IV. Innovative Theoretical and Empirical Proposals
22. Neuroscientific Foundations of Psychopathology, Christopher J. Patrick and Edward M. Bernat
23. Using Evolutionary Principles for Deducing Normal and Abnormal Personality Patterns, Theodore Millon
24. Biopsychosocial Models and Psychiatric Diagnosis, Joel Paris
25. Reactivating the Psychodynamic Approach to the Classification of Psychopathology, Sidney J. Blatt and Patrick Luyten
26. A Life Course Approach to Psychoses: Outcome and Cultural Variation, Rina Dutta & Robin M. Murray
27. The Interpersonal Nexus of Personality and Psychopathology, Aaron L. Pincus, Mark R. Lukowitsky, and Aidan G. C. Wright
28. Reconceptualizing Autism Spectrum Disorders as Autism-Specific Learning Disabilities and Styles, Bryna Siegel
29. Describing Relationship Patterns in DSM-V: A Preliminary Proposal, Marianne Z. Wamboldt, Steven R. H. Beach, Nadine J. Kaslow, Richard E. Heyman, Michael B. First, and David Reiss
30. On the Diversity of the Borderline Syndromes, Michael H. Stone

CONTRIBUTORS
Renato D. Alarcón, MD, MPH, Mood Disorders Unit and Department of Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota
Steven R. H. Beach, PhD, Institute for Behavioral Research, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia
Edward M. Bernat, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Roger K. Blashfield, PhD, Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
Sidney J. Blatt, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
Bekh Bradley, PhD, Trauma Recovery Program, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Jessica Combs, BA, Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
Rina Dutta, MRCPsych, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom
Nicholas R. Eaton, MA, Department of Psychology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
Michael B. First, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York
Elizabeth Flanagan, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut
Joseph P. Gone, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Seth Grossman, PsyD, Counseling and Psychological Services Center, Florida International University, Miami, Florida
William M. Grove, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Richard E. Heyman, PhD, Department of Psychology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York
Nadine J. Kaslow, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia
Jared Keeley, MS, Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
Kenneth S. Kendler, MD, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia
Laurence J. Kirmayer, MD, Culture and Mental Health Research Unit, Institute of Community and Family Psychiatry, Sir Mortimer B. Davis–Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Helena Chmura Kraemer, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California
Robert F. Krueger, PhD, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri
Mark F. Lenzenweger, PhD, Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York
Mark R. Lukowitsky, MA, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
Patrick Luyten, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Mario Maj, MD, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, University of Naples, Naples, Italy
Paul Meehl, PhD (deceased), Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Theodore Millon, PhD, DSc, Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychopathology, Port Jervis, New York
Robin M. Murray, MD, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom
Kile Ortigo, MA, Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Joel Paris, MD, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Christopher J. Patrick, PhD, Department of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
Aaron L. Pincus, PhD, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
Kristin Raley, MS, Department of Psychology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama
David Reiss, MD, Center for Family Research and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, George Washington University Medical Center, Washington, DC
Bryna Siegel, PhD, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California
Erik Simonsen, MD, Psychiatric Research Unit, Roskilde County Psychiatric Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark
Andrew E. Skodol, MD, Sunbelt Collaborative, Tucson, Arizona
Gregory T. Smith, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky
Susan C. South, PhD, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
Michael H. Stone, MD, private practice, New York, New York
Robert Tringone, PhD, Counseling Center, St. John’s University, Jamaica, New York
Scott I. Vrieze, BA, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Jerome C. Wakefield, PhD, School of Social Work, New York University, New York, New York
Marianne Z. Wamboldt, MD, Department of Psychiatry, The Children’s Hospital
University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado
Drew Westen, PhD, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
Aidan G. C. Wright, MS, Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
Peter Zachar, PhD, Department of Psychology, Auburn University Montgomery, Montgomery, Alabama

Edited by Theodore Millon, PhD, DSc, Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychopathology; Robert F. Krueger, PhD, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis; and Erik Simonsen, MD, Psychiatric Research Unit, Roskilde County Psychiatric Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Caversham Booksellers
98 Harbord St, Toronto, ON M5S 1G6 Canada
(click for map and directions)
All prices in $cdn
Copyright 2019

Phone toll-free (800) 361-6120
Tel (416) 944-0962 | Fax (416) 944-0963
E-mail info@cavershambooksellers.com
Hours: 9-6 M-W / 9-7 Th-F / 10-6 Sat / 12-5 Sun EST

search
Click here to read previous issues.
authors
Krueger, Robert F
Millon, Theodore
Simonsen, Erik
other lists
DSM-5
Guilford Publications
Guilford Special Offer
The DSM