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Talking Back to OCD: The Program that Helps Kids and Teens Say "No Way" -- and Parents Say "Way to Go"
John S. March, MD, with Christine M. Benton
The Guilford Press / Softcover / Dec 2006
9781593853556 (ISBN-10: 1593853556)
Obsessive-compulsive Disorder (Self Help) / Families and Parenting
price: $22.50
278 pages
In Stock (Ships within one business day)

Fourteen-year-old Eric is plagued by thoughts that germs on his hands could be making his family sick. Kelly, age 8, feels distressed if she can't count her pencils in multiples of four. No one wants to get rid of OCD more than they do-that's why Talking Back to OCD puts the power to beat obsessions and compulsions in their hands. This uniquely designed volume is really two books in one. The first portion of each chapter teaches children and adolescents skills they can use to take charge of the illness. Instructions that follow show their parents how to provide encouragement and support. Based on the most effective known treatment for OCD, the book demonstrates ways to "boss back" when OCD butts in, enabling many youngsters and teens to eliminate their symptoms entirely. Early-onset OCD is as common as diabetes; this powerful book will help thousands of young people show this unwelcome visitor to the door.

Designed for use by parents and kids together, as a stand-alone resource or an adjunct to therapy. For mental health professionals, the book provides helpful information to use in educating children and parents and introducing cognitive-behavioral strategies. Students will find it a highly accessible introduction to the topic of childhood OCD.

--- from the publisher

Critical Acclaim:

"Gives the best hands-on advice I know on how to help your child conquer this illness. Finally, the right book to give my patients!"
-Judith L. Rapoport, MD, author of The Boy Who Couldn't Stop Washing

"From an internationally recognized expert on childhood OCD, this book is readable, doable, and based on the most up-to-date treatment research. I highly recommend it to parents and children!"
-Henrietta L. Leonard, MD, coauthor of Is It "Just a Phase"?

"There's good news about recovery from childhood OCD, and it's called Talking Back to OCD. Dr. March explains with clarity and compassion what parents deserve to hear: They can make a difference in their children's lives. A highly respected, innovative clinical researcher, he describes each component of recovery in ways that both parents and children will understand and appreciate."-R. Reid Wilson, PhD, author of Don't Panic and coauthor of Stop Obsessing!

"An excellent example of how research findings and first-rate clinical applications can be conveyed in an extremely reader-friendly fashion. The book, which provides sage guidance for both parents and youth, is highly informed and well written. Dr. March has succeeded in providing a valuable resource and clinical tool."-Philip C. Kendall, PhD, Department of Psychology, Temple University

Contents:

Introduction

I. Up Close But Not So Personal: A New Look at OCD for Parents (and Kids)
1. What Is OCD?
2. What Does OCD Look Like?
3. What Causes OCD?
4. How Is OCD Treated?

II. Eight Steps for Getting Rid of Obsessions and Compulsions
5. Step 1: What Kind of Treatment Is This, Anyway?
Step 1: Instructions for Parents
6. Step 2: Talking Back to OCD
Step 2: Instructions for Parents
7. Step 3: Making a Map
Step 3: Instructions for Parents
8. Step 4: Finishing My Toolkit
Step 4: Instructions for Parents
9. Step 5: Beginning to Resist
Step 5: Instructions for Parents
10. Step 6: I'm in Charge Now
Step 6: Instructions for Parents
11. Step 7: Eliminating OCD Everywhere
Step 7: Instructions for Parents
12. Step 8: Keeping OCD Away for Good
Step 8: Instructions for Parents

Summaries of the Steps
How to Find a Therapist
Resources
Appendix: Scales, Checklists, and Other Forms

About the Author:

John S. March, MD, is Chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Duke University Medical Center. Recently, he served as one of the principal investigators of a National Institute of Mental Health-funded project that compared cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, and a combination of the two for helping kids and teens beat OCD. A widely published author of books for professionals, including OCD in Children and Adolescents, his research defines the state of the art for treatment of young people with OCD and other anxiety and mood disorders. In addition to his clinical work, Dr. March is active in the teaching and training of mental health professionals. He lives in Durham, North Carolina.

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